PUSH POLL

How did you do in your exams?



How did you do in your exams?

Poll Archives

finishrip
Advertisement

Key to the university statistics table

Based on Push's average of the price of a pint in the university's and local venues, weighted by the number of students living in and living out. More on the difference this makes…
Source: Push’s exclusive on-site research.

The average price of a drink for a student. It’s based on the prices of a glass of wine, a pint of beer and a glass of orange juice bought in the student bar and the same drinks bought in a local (studenty) pub and then calculating the average (mean) weighted by the number of students living in and living out. More on the difference this makes…
Source: Push’s exclusive on-site research.

The percentage of students entering through the UCAS clearing system. The universities’ own data is usually significantly higher than the figures recorded by UCAS itself. This is because a number of students apply to universities directly during the clearing period and are therefore not officially registered by UCAS as having used the clearing system, but, as far as the students and unis are concerned, the difference is merely bureaucratic. More on the difference this makes…
Source: the universities’ own data supplied to Push.

The number of places for undergraduate students in university accommodation. More on the difference this makes…
Source: the universities’ own data supplied to Push.

The average (mode) course length. At some unis, there’s more variation than others. See individual profiles for more details.More on the difference this makes…
Source: the universities’ own data supplied to Push.

Each year Push interviews a number of students from every university (at least 15, often more), recording, among other things, their year of study, their expected course length and their debts to a number of different lenders (such as banks, the SLC, credit cards, etc). The debt per year of study is based on the average (mean) of these debts, taking into account how long the students have been studying already and the time of year of the interviews. More on the difference this makes…
Source: calculation exclusive to Push, based on exclusive on-site research.

Each year Push interviews a number of students from every university (at least 15, often more), recording, among other things, their year of study, their expected course length and their debts to a number of different lenders (such as banks, the SLC, credit cards, etc). The debt per year of study is based on the average (mean) of these debts, taking into account how long the students have been studying already and the time of year of the interviews. More on the difference this makes…
Source: calculation exclusive to Push, based on exclusive on-site research.

aka the ‘non-continuation rate’, this is the percentage of students who enter a full-time first-degree in a particular year who are no longer studying in higher education the following year and have not obtained a qualification. It’s not the same as the flunk rate because the drop is based on actual numbers rather than projections and just records students in their first year who don’t move on (rather than across their whole degree course) and so it’s bound to be much lower.
Source: Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

The average (mean) number of UCAS tariff points held by students who are actually admitted to the uni. As such, it’s a measure of their previous base level of academic performance. Some would say it’s a measure of how bright the students are, but that’s a bold claim. It’s not the same as the entry requirements. For example, a uni might expect students to have 3 Bs (300 points) to study French.That means if you’re not expecting to get at least close to 3 Bs, it may not be w

Last updated on: 12 September 2008

Please type your comment here